Frederick Kiesler, Modernist Visionary

ml_Frederick Kiesler_200Frederick Kiesler (1890–1965) was a polarizing figure that stirred conventional thought and caused consternation with his outlandish ideas of curved walls and biomorphic furniture featured in his 1942 interior design for Peggy Guggenheim’s “Art of This Century” gallery. Kiesler arrived in New York in 1926 from his homeland of Ukraine, bringing with him avant-garde ideas learned as the youngest member of de Stijl. Kiesler was a multi-disciplined artist that believed “form does not follow function. Function follows vision. Vision follows reality.” Called “the greatest non-building architect of our time,” Kiesler’s unbuilt visions of a home that connected to its inhabitants through solar energy, sensory lighting and large screens splashed with art seem prescient of today’s interactive and electronic home innovations. Deemed a charlatan by some and a visionary by others, Kiesler’s evocative ideas continue to be thought-provoking.

KEISLER COLLAGE
Column 1:  Frederick Kiesler; Marcel DuChamp, mixed media, 1947 (Photo:  MoMA); Column 2:  Multi-use Chair, 1942 (Photo:  MoMA); Nesting Coffee Table 1935-38 (Photo: MoMA); “Horse Galaxy,” Mixed media installation, 1954 (Photo: Jason McCoy Gallery, New York); Column 3: Dying Horse, bronze, 1963 (Photo: Jason McCoy Gallery, New York); Totem for All Religions, Wood and Rope, 1947 (Photo: MoMA)

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